Joyce Family (Corgary)

Nov 28th, 2012 | By | Category: Tales of the Joyce Family

FAMILY: JOYCE (CORGARY)

Family name: Joyce (Corgary)
Family title:
Description:
Estates:
  • Joyce (Corgary) – An estate bought by Walter Joyce of Mervue from the French family in 1806. In the mid 19th century it was comprised of 7 townlands in the parish of Killoscobe, barony of Tiaquin, county Galway, some of which was leased to the Concannons. Walter Joyce had 3 sons, Walter of Corgary, Pierce of Mervue and Thomas of Rahasane Park. In the mid 1870s Walter Joyce of Corgary owned about 1,000 acres in county Mayo, 2,828 in county Galway and smaller acreages in Galway town and county Clare (365 acres at Muckinish East, parish of Drumcreehy, barony of Burren). 680 acres of the Joyce estate was vested in the Congested Districts’ Board in March 1913. Walter Joyce of Corgary was fatally shot in January 1923 and following his death his estate was sold to the Land Commission.
  • French (Corgary) – An estate in the barony of Tiaquin, county Galway, established in the late 16th century by a younger son of Peter French, Mayor of Galway, 1576-1577. Abbert in the parish of Monivea was sold to the Blakeneys by 1720 and Corgary/Corgerry, parish of Killoscobe, to the Joyces circa 1806.
  • Joyce (Mervue) – The Joyces of Mervue, Corgary and Rahasane were all descended from a family of Joyces long established in the town of Galway. In the 18th century the Joyce family prospered in their mercantile and banking activities and began to acquire land, including the lease of Mervue from the Governors of the Erasmus Smith Schools in 1789. In 1792 they sold property in county Mayo to the Blakes of Towerhill. In the 19th century the Joyces of Mervue held lands in the baronies of Clare (Annaghdown, Claregalway and Lackagh parishes), Tiaquin (Killoscobe parish), Longford and Dunkellin, county Galway and in the townland of Kinlough, parish of Shrule, barony of Kilmaine, county Mayo. By the 1870s they owned 3,742 acres in county Galway, 146 in the town of Galway and 381 acres in county Mayo. Thomas Joyce bought Rahasane Park in 1846 and in 1855 Pierce Joyce was leasing Ardfry House from the trustees of Lord Wallscourt. Frank Joyce was agent to the Earl of Clanricarde between 1882 and 1887. In 1909 Pierce Joyce had accepted an offer from the Congested Districts Board for over 300 acres of his estate.
  • Concanon – The Concannons were formerly Gaelic chiefs in the Kilkerrin area of north east Galway. The lands of Carrownacregg were granted to Sisby O’Concannon by patent dated 21 Mar 1678. Waterloo replaced Carrownacregg as the main family residence in the early 19th century. In 1824 Edmund Concannon, of Waterloo Lodge, is recorded as a resident proprietor in county Galway. He married Jane daughter of John Blake of Belmont and his wife Sarah Cuff, sister of Baron Tyrawley. Blake Foster records that they had six sons, the eldest Henry was a barrister and married Countess Maria Aurora Arabella de Luicia. The third son Edmond married Kate Parsons and they had a son Edmond John. James Blake Concannon of Esker was the fourth son. Over 3000 acres owned by Edmond John Concannon and Edward Thomas Beytagh, were offered for sale in the Encumbered Estates Court in 1851. Much of the land was in the baronies of Clare and Dunkellin, county Galway and some of it was on perpetual lease from the Clanricarde estate. At the time of Griffith’s Valuation the Concannons held land in the parish of Killoscobe, barony of Tiaquin, some of which was leased from Walter Joyce of Corgary and also in the parish of Grange, barony of Loughrea. Henry Concannon sold Carrownacregg West, including a mansion ‘out of repair’, to James Browne in 1851. Three persons named Concannon with addresses at Tuam, Dunmore and Castleblakeney, owned small acreages in county Galway in the 1870s. Loughnane,writing in 1975, gives an account of working for the Concannon family at Rockfield between 1910-1931.
  • Armstrong/Armstrong MacDonnell (Newhall) – The Armstrongs of Mount Heaton share a common ancestry with the Armstrongs of Moyaliff, county Tipperary. By the beginning of the 18th century they were resident at Farney Castle, county Tipperary and Mount Heaton, county Offaly, came into the family’s possession through the marriage of Colonel William Armstrong with a Heaton heiress in 1731. Mount Heaton (now known as Mount St Josephs) then became the main family residence and Farney Castle was given to William’s younger brother John Armstrong. In 1809 William Henry Armstrong married Bridget MacDonnell of Newhall, county Clare. Burke’s Landed Gentry (1904) records that he sold Mount Heaton in 1817 and went to live on the Continent. In 1834 he sold his estate in Fermanagh and much of his estates in Limerick, Tipperary and England. The second son of this marriage William Edward Armstrong succeeded his uncle John MacDonnell in 1850, adopting the name MacDonnell in 1858. He married Juliana daughter of Sir Lucius O’Brien Baron of Inchiquin. At the time of Griffith’s Valuation William E. Armstrong’s county Clare estate was concentrated in the parish of Doora, barony of Bunratty Upper and in the parishes of Kilballyowen, Kilmacduane, Moyarta and Kilfearagh, barony of Moyarta. Besides inherited valuable MacDonnell properties in counties Clare and Limerick he also inherited large debts and advertised for sale over 5,600 acres including the Kilbreckan estate in December 1856 and also 139 acres in county Galway. Following the 1856 sale his county Clare estate was mainly located in West Clare near Kilkee. Despite the sale Colonel William E. Armstrong MacDonnell still owned 6,670 acres in county Clare in the 1870s. He died in 1883 and his son Charles Randal MacDonnell owned the house and over 500 acres of untenanted land in 1906. The estate was later sold to the tenants and Newhall house to the Joyce family of county Galway. It was still in the possession of the Joyces in the 1980s. The eldest son of Willilam H. Armstrong and Bridget MacDonnell was John Armstrong who held an estate in the parishes of Major William Armstrong of Farney Castle held land in the parishes of Holycross and Inch, barony of Eliogarty and Ballycahill, barony of Kilnamanagh Upper, at the time of Griffith’s Valuation. In the 1870s Mrs L. Armstrong of Farney Castle owned 896 acres in county Tipperary. Farney Castle and other lands in the baronies of Eliogarty and Kilnamanagh, the estate of William Armstrong were advertised for sale in July 1884.

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